SAILOn Provides One-Stop Shopping for Interactive Lessons

SAILOn is a collaborative effort of 9 different school districts in the Houston area. Their goal is to help classroom teachers integrate technology into the curriculum by identifying and providing interactive Internet resources addressing specific objectives. When you navigate to your particular grade level, you will find a plethora of interactive resources that support all content areas. These resources can be used as a way of introducing a topic or reinforcing skills through workstations in your classroom or lessons in the computer lab.
They don’t have an interactive activity for every single TEK…yet. It looks like something they are continually updating. If you find an activity that you would like to use with your students and need an extra set of hands, please let me know. I can also help you create some task cards and recording sheets for use in a workstation.
I hope you find this as useful as I do:)

Paired Passages With Scholastic BookFlix

 

computer monitor

 

Scholastic BookFlix is a new online literacy resource that pairs classic video storybooks from Weston Woods with related nonfiction eBooks from Scholastic to build a love of reading and learning. BookFlix is an engaging way to link fact and fiction, and it reinforces early reading skills by introducing  children to a world of knowledge and exploration. Bookflix also offers lesson plans, web links, puzzles and games based on the books shared.

Contact your librarian for your campus login.

Storybird for Collaborative Writing and Technology Workstations

Storybird is my new favorite Web 2.0 tool (except for Google Earth, of course) and have found alternative uses for it. This is the website’s great explanation of their concept:

What is Storybird?

Storybird is a service that uses collaborative storytelling to connect kids and families. Two (or more) people create a Storybird in a round robin fashion by writing their own text and inserting pictures. They then have the option of sharing their Storybird privately or publicly on the network. The final product can be printed, watched on screen, played with like a toy, or shared through a worldwide library.

Storybird is also a simple publishing platform for writers and artists that allows them to experiment, publish their stories, and connect with their fans.

How does Storybird work?

It’s simple. Someone starts a Storybird by writing a few words or grabbing a few images. Then the other person takes a turn, adding more words and pictures. In as little as one or two turns they can finish and share a Storybird. It’s that easy. And they can do it sitting side-by-side or across the country from each other.

http://storybird.com/faq/general/#what-is-storybird

I’m always trying to find new and innovative ways to use technology during centers or workstation times. Teachers can create their own digital instructions for activities in all subject areas in a matter of minutes. Giving students the freedom to choose the activity along with the option of how to present their products will enhance the learning experience.

Click here to see an example of a Storybird workstation activity:

Choose one of the following activities to complete in your workstation. You can record your answers in a Neo, Word Document or PowerPoint. on Storybird

Creating a free teacher account is easy. Just follow the steps below:

http://storybird.com/teachers/

StoryBird Instructions created by Sarah Ogden

Storybird Login Cards

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

 

 

 

 

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WORDFOTO- $1.99

 

You’ve probably heard the tired cliche about a picture being worth a thousand words. We’ve taken this phrase quite literally and created WordFoto, an app that turns photos and words into amazing typographic works of art.

Instructional Uses:

  • Animal Research
  • Creative Writing Prompt
  • Describing Characteristics of Landforms
  • Word Families
  • Beginning and Ending Sounds
  • Five Senses
  • Matter

My Favorite PowerPoint Lesson!

I LOVE THIS LESSON!  In the new NEISD world of iDevices and Web 2.0 tools, I’m always telling teachers not to forget about the world of PowerPoint.  This isn’t your everyday, boring slideshow.  This is a really cool fun foldable that can be used with any subject matter.  It can be created from scratch or can be saved as a template for younger grades to use.  Here is an example of what a completed project looks like using images from Google Earth:

You can use this template for multiplication facts, animal adaptations, parts of a cycle, scientific process….on and on!  Below you will find a blank template with directions, the Google Earth example you see above, and the landforms template.

LandformFlipbook_Final Product

LandformFlipbook_Template

Question and Answer Filpbook_Blank

 

 

 

 

Using More Than One App at a Time

While my husband was watching football on a Saturday afternoon (ugh), I decided to play around with this new app I found.  It’s not free ($4.99), but it’s crazy cool.  Corkulous is a great app for allowing students to explain Math, Science, or any other concepts they are learning in the classroom.  It allows you to upload images, create post-it notes to explain information and works great with other apps such as Doodle Buddy if you want to add personal drawings.  Here is an example I used to explain the water cycle:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The app also allows you to create a template as well as beginning a new project from scratch.  I uploaded some images in dropbox that I knew I wanted to include in this explanation.  When I finished my corkboard, I saved the image in My Photos on the iPad.  Then I opened Doodle Buddy, inserted my corkboard, and drew the arrows to represent the order of each process.  The last step was to save the image again and email it to myself.  It sounds tricky at first, but once you (and your kids) get the hang of it, the sky is the limit!

The Four Seasons App Task Card

I came across this adorable app called Four Seasons in the iTunes app store. ( I love it when I find something cute and it’s FREE!)  This app is perfect for a Science or Language Arts technology workstation. First, search the app store and download it on your iDevice.  It looks like this-

I have also included a task card for you to use. There are other free books as well as this one. You can access them on the last page of the book. Enjoy!

Task Card for Four Seasons App

Interactive Whiteboard Language Arts Tips From Scholastic

Building Language for Literacy
Make the connection between letters and sounds. (PreK–K)


Practical Tips:

Have students practice their rhyming skills with Reggie the Rhyming Rhino. Display the activity on Whiteboard and have different students choose the words that rhyme.
Nina the Naming Newt will help students identify places within their community and common items found in those places. This is a wonderful activity to use with a social studies unit about community. Display the activity on Whiteboard and have different students drag the correct items into the box.
All of these activities can be used for small group instruction, especially the “Leo the Letter-Loving Lobster” activity. Help a small group of students with letter recognition by displaying the activity on the Whiteboard and having students choose the letters that match the object. Students can also keep a word dictionary in a notebook and add the new words that they spelled.
Go to Building Language for Literacy
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Clifford Interactive Storybooks
Play with phonics to build stories, in English and Spanish. (PreK–2)

Practical Tips:

Use these activities during circle time or a morning meeting to have students practice reading together. Students will enjoy choosing the words to complete the story they’re reading.
If you have voting capabilities, invite students to vote for which word they want to use to complete the story.
Do a “picture walk.” Before reading the story or listening to the audio, talk about the elements in the illustration. Have students circle and label the elements before reading the page.
Go to Clifford Interactive Storybooks
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Clifford Learning Games
Practice letters, sounds, and sight words with the Big Red Dog. (PreK–2)

Practical Tips:

Practice letter recognition with the word match game. Activity can be completed as a whole class or with a small group of students who need extra practice. Have students take turns dragging the words into the box with the appropriate starting letter.
Make new words using the “Make a Word” game. Display the activity on Whiteboard when students enter the classroom and challenge each student to create a new word. Students will look forward to creating new words when they enter the classroom in the morning. The “Make a Word” game can also be used whole class to review vowel sounds and even rhyming words.
Go to Clifford Learning Games
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Scholastic Videos
Bring authors into your classroom and build excitement around books. (PreK–12)

Check out the vast video collection for:

Video Book Talks
Video Book Trailers
Author Read-Alouds
Practical Tips:

Get students excited about an author study by showing a short video of the author on the Whiteboard.
Inspire young writers to enjoy writing and to understand the writing process by introducing them to published authors. Start a mini-lesson on where writers get their ideas by playing one of the many videos included in the collection. Have students make a list of how published authors come up with their writing ideas. Videos can also be used for mini-lessons on editing, revision, character development, etc.
Use videos to inspire students to create their own author videos. After students view several author videos on the Whiteboard, have them brainstorm ideas and topics to include in their own author video. Students will not only think about themselves as writers, they will be inspired to write more.
Go to Scholastic Videos

Story Starters
Generate creative writing prompts and then write stories. (K–6)

Practical Tips:

This is a perfect activity for students to complete as a morning activity. Display “Story
Starters” on Whiteboard and assign one student each day to spin the wheel. Students can write their creative stories in their Writer’s Notebook.
Do you have an extra few minutes between classroom activities and need something to do? Display “Story Starters” on your Whiteboard and have a student spin the wheel. Give students time to start writing their stories. Students can finish their stories during the day or for homework.
Go to Story Starters
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Character Scrapbook
Create illustrated pages that analyze favorite characters from any book. (K–8)

Practical Tips:

Help students learn how to determine character traits of a character in a book. Use a class read-aloud to model on the Whiteboard how to complete the activity. Have students come up to the Whiteboard and write down what they know about a character. Once this activity is modeled, students can complete it independently in the computer lab or at a center.
Challenge students to critically think about characters in books you are reading in class. Complete the “Ten things I know about . . . ” page, and have students use their critical thinking skills to determine which character of the book fits the descriptions displayed on the board.
Go to Character Scrapbook
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Flashlight Readers
Interact with your favorite books through games, slide shows, and videos. (1–8)

Practical Tips:

Show students the importance of revision in the writing process. Use Kate DiCamillo’s
“Slide Show of Drafts” to discuss the revision process and allow students to connect to a published author. Play each draft slide and have students write down how Kate DiCamillo revised the draft. When finished, have students use the strategies learned to revise their own writing.
Video and audio clips can be displayed on the Whiteboard to introduce an author study or to pique students’ interest in a book they’re going to read.
Do your students need extra grammar practice? Use Charlotte’s Web “Pick-the-Perfect-Word Game” to practice identifying nouns, verbs, adjectives, and prefixes. Display the activity on Whiteboard and have students move the correct words into Charlotte’s web.
Go to Flashlight Readers
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Poetry Idea Engine
Write haikus, free verse, limericks, and more. (1–8)

Practical Tips:

Display the “Poetry Idea Engine” and choose a type of poetry to teach. Each one explains the definition of the poem to assist with teaching. Have students create different poems for each type by dragging words into the blanks. After learning about each type of poem, have students create their own in groups, pairs, or individually.
Leave the poetry machine up to use at a center. Students can create a poem on the board, then write one at the center.
Go to Poetry Idea Engine
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Scholastic News Top Story
Focus on main idea, topic sentences, and essay structure with timely subjects. (3–8)

Practical Tips:

Select Top News story at your class reading level (each top story is available with leveled versions for grade 3, 4, 5–6, and 7–8). Display on Whiteboard and ask students to read aloud. Use the editing functions on your Whiteboard to highlight main and supporting ideas and key vocabulary. This is good practice for reading comprehension test skills.
Display the most-recent Top News story on your Whiteboard for transition time as students arrive, submit homework, etc. Ask students to do a five-minute free write in their Writer’s Notebook of reactions, personal connections, or fictional versions of what happens next.
Go to Scholastic News Top Story
Go to Teacher’s Guide

Myths Brainstorming Machine
Choose the elements to create your own myth. (4–9)

Practical Tips:

Use the brainstorming tool to model brainstorming ideas to write a myth. Have students work through choosing a setting, monster, and god/goddess as a whole class. Then model how to use the outline to write the myth.
Use this brainstorming tool with students who are struggling for writing ideas. Display the “Myths Brainstorming Machine” and have struggling students choose in a small group which setting, monster, and god/goddess they would like to use in their story. Print out the idea outline to get them started writing.
Go to Myths Brainstorming Machine
Go to Teacher’s Guide